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4 Outfits That Go With a Red Cap

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on October 16, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

The red hand knit cap is the beginning and the heart of our company. Everyone from Jaques Cousteau to Kanye West wears them. But what outfits go well with a red beanie?

1. Red cap, blue denim shirt — Marvin Gaye, Jaques Cousteau, Steve Zissou

They are poster children for the red cap, and are mentioned a lot in Red Hat Factory articles. What all their iconic outfits have in common is the red/blue contrast, which is one of my personal favorites. I often wear a denim shirt with my red cap.

2. Red cap, green jacket — Kanye West

In nature, the red cap stands out, and that is kind of the point. Wearing military style greens with the cap is never a mistake. Especially if you’re out hunting and want to avoid being mistaken for a moose.

As you blend with nature, the cap pops even more.

It is yet another favorite for us at the Factory.

3. Red cap, yellow rain jacket

Yellow has become the iconic color for rain jackets. Red is the same for knit caps. Two bright icons together creates a colorful collision. Also, the rain jacket as a fisherman’s working wear, draws out the history of the fisherman beanie in your outfit.

Red cap, yellow rain jacket.
The red cap goes so well with a yellow rain jacket.

4. Red cap on a monochrome backdrop

Black and white are seldom wrong “color” choices when it comes to lending voice to other pieces of apparel. If you want your beanie to shine, why not go monochrome — white or black?

Red cap on black and white shirt
Black and white, with a radiating spot of red.

Confidence

Here at Red Hat Factory we are much more interested in seeing what you can come up with.

How you integrate our caps into your style is way more fun than telling you how to do it. That is why we deliver our hand knit pieces as a long “sausage” of wool that you fold yourself.

After all, though it’s a corny thing to say, the best piece of apparel is actually confidence.

Jaques Cousteau — A Deep Dive

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on October 6, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

He gets a lot of mention on Red Hat Factory. The legend, the sea farer — or more accurately, below-sea farer — the style guru for Red Hatters across the world, and diving equipment development pioneer. But was he also a megalomaniac? Let’s find out.

Born 1910 in France, his career first pointed him towards the air. He had completed mostly every step on the way to become a naval pilot, when luck struck him.

He broke both his arms in a car accident.

Jaques and his son Philippe Cousteau
Jaques and his son Philippe Cousteau.

It broke him out of his current career path, and maybe it made him think twice. After that accident, he chose to pursue his passion for the ocean, for which he would devote his whole life.

“The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.”

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Cousteau the documentary film maker

At the beginning of WWII, Jaques-Yves Cousteau and his wife Simone took refuge in Megève, a small village near the French Alps — not far from Mont Blanc. Here he met Marcel Ichac.

Cousteau and Ichac had one thing in common — documentary films. Ichac’s passion for showing inaccessible mountains to the public, and Cousteau’s passion for the depths, made for an interesting duo.

Jaques Cousteau filming under water.
Jaques Cousteau filming under water.

It began a long line of documentary releases, some of which made film history.

“Every explorer I have met has been driven—not coincidentally but quintessentially—by curiosity, by a single-minded, insatiable, and even jubilant need to know.”

Jacques-Yves Cousteau — The Human, the Orchid, and the Octopus

In 1943, they won their first prize for a co-made documentary called Par dix-huit mètres de fond, or in English, 18 meters deep. It was filmed on the French Embiez Islands with no breathing equipment.

The camera was always with Cousteau, and his two main interests remained diving and film making through his life.

His most significant release was without a doubt The Silent World, which won an Academy Award for best Documentary Feature, and was the first ever documentary film to win an Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival. The film was cut from 25 kilometer of film reel, filmed over 2 years, and brought the depths to the public like never before.

The Silent World, by Jaques Cousteau movie poster.
The Silent World movie poster.

Cousteau, inventor of the Aqua-Lung

The desire to go ever deeper and unveil hidden depths to the public, drove Cousteau and his crew to ever greater lengths. The next film Épaves, or Shipwrecks, was filmed using the first ever Aqua-Lung prototype.

The Aqua-Lung is the invention that brought air-tank based diving equipment to the general public, and Émile Gagnan, a French engineer, together with our man Cousteau are credited with its creation.

Jaques Costeau dressed up in diving equipment
Jaques Costeau dressed up in diving equipment.

The Aqua-Lung was not a completely new idea — few inventions are — but it came from a couple of other genius contraptions combined to maximize the time one could spend underwater.

Once again it was Cousteau’s desire to go deeper that drove the innovation forward. And it would be far from the last time.

“From birth, man carries the weight of gravity on his shoulders. He is bolted to earth. But man has only to sink beneath the surface and he is free.”

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Cousteau, Captain of the Calypso

For some years Cousteau worked with the brand new Underwater Research Group, which was created by the French navy to add force behind his endeavors to explore the depths.

His time within the group led him on everything from mine-clearing missions, to rescue operations, to spying endeavors across the entire world. All along, he pioneered underwater technology and explored further possibilities.

The Calypso, Jaques Cousteau's ship
The Calypso, the iconic home base of Jaques Cousteau.

After a few years he left the navy and leased his now infamous ship, the Calypso. The lease was one franc per year — a mere symbolic sum — and the ship became his home base. A research vessel fitted for diving and documentary film making.

“The sea, the great unifier, is man’s only hope. Now, as never before, the old phrase has a literal meaning: we are all in the same boat.”

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

Cousteau, maker of the diving saucer

It was during his time on Calypso, after years of experience and clout generation, that he teamed up with Jean Mollard, and they built the commonly dubbed “diving saucer.”

It was exactly what it sounds like — a flying saucer that could go to 350 meters of depth. The official name was SP-350 and the nickname, Denise. It could handle a crew of two, laying down, and was famously used by Cousteau to explore the wreck of HMHS Britannic.

Jaques Costeau's diving saucer, SP-350, or "Denise."
The diving saucer, SP-350, or “Denise.”

Actually, the search for Britannic, which is a sister ship of the Titanic and the Olympic, began under quite interesting circumstance.

Jaques Cousteau was in Greece looking for Atlantis. Yes, that Atlantis — the legendary city, sunken in the sea.

He didn’t find the city, but during his time there, he was contacted by the Titanic Historical Society, who wanted him to search for Titanic’s lost sister. The Britannic had sunk at some unknown location while serving as a hospital ship during WWI. This one he did find, and its discovery began what would mount up to 68 manned dives to the wreck by Jaques and his team.

One of these dives, in Denise, happened when Jaques was 67 years old, and it became one of Cousteau’s deepest dives ever.

Cousteau, creator of the Conshelf underwater colony

Astronauts actually owe a lot to Cousteau. He was among the first to spearhead a humane habitat in an atmosphere not fit for human life. Under the sea, he built a village, where him and his crew could spend months at a time.

The Conshelf II.

There has been a Conshelf I, II, and III built and launched.

The Conshelf I.

One of the shelfs even had a docking station for Denise.

Obviously, the adventurers were studying ocean life while they lived down below, but also, their living situation provided insight into how a different air pressure affected humans. Their hair and beards grew slower, but cuts healed quicker. It was an alien world, and they made it habitable in a whole new way.

The Conshelves are covered in much more detail in this brilliant Medium article.

“The best way to observe a fish is to become a fish.”

Jacques Yves Cousteau

Cousteau the megalomaniac

There is a Jaques Cousteau quote that’s circulating the internet. It’s pretty shocking, and after some research, it turns out it’s completely genuine.

“In order to save the planet it would be necessary to kill 350,000 people per day.”

Jacques-Yves Cousteau

The quote in its context is just as bad as it sounds. Talking to UNESCO about what we could do to eliminate human suffering and disease, he replied that it was probably not a great idea to do, since for the planet to survive we would have to eliminate 350,000 people a day. (My understanding of the quote is that we should let nature run its course on the sick, and don’t interfere.)

Lightly perusing Jaques Cousteau’s life, you see an otherworldly, almost painting-esque adventurer, but if you dig a bit deeper, his humanity shines through, in all its imperfection. And as you’ll see, he was a man willing to admit to his shortcomings.

I am not a fan of holding a man to his mistakes, but this is a side of the picture that needs painting as well, if we’re doing the deep dive.

Costeau the environmentalist

Many connect Jaques with a fiery engagement for nature — as we saw on the earlier quote — but for him to become the spokesman for mother nature that he became, a complete u-turn was required.

During the filming of The Silent World, Cousteau and his crew famously injured a whale on purpose, thus attracting sharks who ate the poor fellow — all for the movie shots.

At another time they used dynamite near a coral reef to study the species that come floating to the surface — something that to your modern ears may sound worse than the filthiest swearword.

Jaques Cousteau diving with flares.
Revealing the world below.

However, later in Cousteau’s life he did a 180, and began speaking up for the ocean big time.

To such a point was his turnaround that he is said to have insisted on sharing the clips where him and his crew mistreats oceanic life to create great shots — instead of attempting a cover up.

Though he tried to dive ever deeper, he was willing to let his humanity float to the surface.

“Water and air, the two essential fluids on which all life depends, have become global garbage cans.”

Jacques Yves Cousteau

In the beginning of his career, movie making seems to have taken the front seat, and the ocean was only a tool to be manipulated in ways to get the best shot. However, as his understanding of the ocean, and its relationship to humankind deepened, the focus turned.

His turnaround engagement resulted in the founding of the Cousteau Society for the Protection of Ocean Life, which still is actively teaching people across the globe about the ocean and its ecosystems.

Costeau the Red Hatter

Here at Red Hat Factory, of course, we connect with Jaques not only as fellow adventurers with a passion for creating wilderness-related media, but also through our namesake red hat.

The Undersea World of Jaques Cousteau
Jaques becomes a tv-series host.

The red knit cap that Jaques Cousteau wore became an icon, very much because of the man himself (and his crew, who also wore them). (Wes Anderson also had a role in bringing it to the next generation.)

After having spent most his life on sea, he slowly became a tv-personality and a household name. Through both film and tv he made his way into people’s living rooms, thus connecting the red hat with adventure forever and after.

The red hat has a whole story in itself, running back through the navy, but that’s a subject for another article. All we need to cap this article off (pun not intended), is a fantastic quote from one of Cousteau’s tv-appearances.

“The Calypso crew and I will be undertaking a series of voyages of exploration and discovery in all the seas of the world. We have few rules and no uniforms, only the right cap.” 

Jaques-Yves Cousteau

And so do we. The world is at our feet, and we have few rules — only the right cap.

Cousteau continues to inspire, not only for his hunger for the deeps, and skill in the craft of film making, but for his willingness to change as he went along in life, and to not attempt a perfect fasade.

The History of the Fisherman Beanie

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on September 10, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

Rough, sturdy and simple — the working class fisherman and his rough knit cap has ever been an inspiration for how we knit our products. But how deep into that history can we dig?

We already wrote a whole article about the Steve Zissou hat, and how that has shaped our beanies. Steve is a fictional character who draws his inspiration from red beanie wearing, submarine genius Jaques Cousteau. But what inspiration was he drawing on? — what connected beanies to the seafarer in the first place?

History of the fisherman beanie

I’d love to come up with something deeply symbolic, but I think history is very simple — yet beautiful — when it comes to the fisherman beanie.

Imagine coastal society. It’s a time when most women are the keepers of the house, while the men are out providing for the family’s economical needs.

“The Knitting Woman” by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Say what you want about gender roles — I’m not here to discuss that, but simply to dig into history.

There are deep historical roots to why knitting is prevalent among women in Norway (where Red Hat Factory comes from) to this day. I know my mother learnt it from her mother, who again probably learnt it from hers — the roots stretch far back.

Those days were a time when the woman was tasked with actually protecting the household against the elements — and among the responsibilities was keeping her family warm at the onset of winter.

In our imagined little coastal society, not all the fishermen could afford a water proof sou’wester, so the next best alternative stood in line. Wool was readily available, and the property of wool that isolates even when wet made it a fine second choice.

So she knits him a beanie, tight knit because of years of skill (she has knit for every one of her seven kids) and full of care because she desperately wants her man to come home from the sea, today as every day before.

“The Old Fisherman” by Paul Crompton. The fisherman wears the more sophisticated sou’wester.

In this way the hand knit fisherman beanie represents a simple life of hard work and survival that most people through history has lived.

It is good to look at history for perspective, and maybe to gain some gratefulness.

Real fishermen beanies

Finding images of actual fishermen, wearing beanies is tremendously hard. The modern trend of the fisherman beanie has taken over image searches, pushing the black and white genuine photos aside.

Mostly whenever I find a picture of what we would call a fisherman beanie today, it turns out to be a modern day portrait, taken with a vintage style. The real pictures I’ve found however, reveals something very interesting.

It seems that people put whatever they wanted on their heads before heading out to sea. And that is just how we like it.

The super long fishermen beanies with pom-poms

You might have noticed on the first picture, beside Cousteau, that the fisherman has an incredibly long beanie with a pom-pom at the end.

The style derives from fishing societies in Portugal, specifically the Povoan culture.

The culture was centered around fishing. Their legends and their religion — it all swirled around the sea, sea creatures and fish. Saint Andrew was believed to fish the souls of the perished at sea into heaven, and they avoided work on Sunday because of an old legend about a sea serpent punishing people who violated the holy day of rest.

Most importantly though, they wore the longest fishermen beanies the world has ever seen with pom-pom and all — and with that they sported the wildest sideburns known to man.

Deeming from the last illustration, the beanies were even red. And you know exactly how we feel about that!

The Shaping of Our Beanie Models

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on September 4, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

When we set out to design the first ever Red Hat Factory model, we didn’t go looking for the spectacular. Quite the contrary.

Looking at products and heritage items we consider absolute classics, we noticed one commonality. The classic yellow rain jacket, rough worn oak tables, faded leather belts, the knives that my dad has hanging on his wall, that we have used on all my childhood adventures — they all share one trait.

Simplicity.

From the outset, we knew we were making a product the old way — the way it’s been done from generation to generation. And wanting to also create a product that would be appreciated for generations, I let my mom take me back in time, showing me an array of basic simple knitting methods and their aesthetics.

Red beanie on Norwegian traditional wool sweater.
What we in Norway call ribbestrikk. It’s one of the basic tools of the craft. Here a Southlander is laying on a Norwegian Setesdalsgenser — a regional traditional sweater pattern.

Following the red thread

I’ve learned through both design and writing, that the creative process often starts with a more bloated product, and then is slimmed down through the cutting off of unnecessary features.

I am sure a lot of you can relate that to your own work. We often over-design — then cut back.

For the first Red Hat Factory cap, we went through 5–10 different models, and model by model we dropped things. First the unique knit pattern along the edge, then the shaped panels that gave an approximate head shape to the product.

Four red beanie styles
An extremely rare photo of some of the pre-production experimental models. My wife right there in the middle. Most, if not all these beanies are given away a long time ago.

Finally, after hours upon hours of work, I dropped a final idea on my mother. “What if we just make the hat a tube, and let the owner shape it by wearing it.”

It sounds boring, but in all its simplicity, it actually worked best.

And the people loved it.

“The quality is amazing, and I know I’ll be able to use it for years to come!”

Morten Furre, Australia

“Fantastic quality, durable and stylish. Each Red Hat has been hand crafted with love and attention to detail.”

Greg Burkin, Canada
Red beanie on Norwegian traditional sweater.
The final beanie is just a tube sown together on the top. You create the fold yourself.

“[The Southlander] is by far my favorite – it’s quality top notch and unlike my other beanies it feels just perfect. Whether you’re dressed up and going out on the town or just heading to the store this is a must for any occasion.”

Nathan Pearson, USA

“I am using the Southlander pretty much every day.”

Asbjørn Østreim, Norway

“Like a good wine, this gets better with age.”

Billy Chester, USA

We knew we had hit something.

First model down

Finally the first of what was to become the Southlander was off the needles, knit using the technique called ribbestrikk in Norwegian, and sowed together in an x on the top. Nothing more nothing less.

Red beanie in Stockholm
Me randomly snatching brand photos while hanging out with friends in Stockholm. This is the first Southlander ever made (at the time called “the Rounded”) and I still have it at home.

The tube shape makes it look small when you get it, but once it’s had some time to shape itself to your head, it becomes better fitted to you than any pre-formed shape could bring.

Also, since the cap is a simple tube with no defined edge, you control how you fold it. We have another article that dives deeper into possible folding styles.

From fishermen to carpenters, the simple, yet gritty style of a workman’s beanie has been a hallmark of the hard working craftsman.

Simple is classic.

Simple hats, simple brand

When we first released the beanies to the webshop, the Southlander was simply named the Rounded. And paired with the simple design and the simple name, came a very simple sketched icon.

First brand of the rounded red beanie.
The first Red Hat Factory product — the Rounded.

The whole brand was built and centered from the historic notion of the old beanie, knit by a wife before she sent her husband out on the sea to haul fish nets in the pouring rain.

While he is out fishing, the woman gets a business idea, and hastily she sketches down a few beanies with her pen. Then she sighs and peers out the window, wondering whether he will return today or not.

Little did that proverbial woman know she was planting the seed of Red Hat Factory to come.

That is the story behind the type of assets we use in the brand to this day. They have evolved a lot, but the style remains. Mom-made. Home made. Simple lines.

Three red beanies.
The three beanie models we have today, with the overhauled brand names.

A Point to the Round

The North Cap was at first a failed attempt to cap off the beanie in a round fashion. It became pointier than it was supposed to.

When my quirky brother in law saw it, however, he loved it more than what I considered the final product. I soon realized we needed a second model. Based on the first, but with a touch of different, for the more explorative soul.

In line with the simple brand, we just named it the Pointy Tip.

Red beanie.
The second model’s initial branding.

Its base was, and still is, exactly the same as the Southlander, but it caps off in a peak rather than a half circle, making it the first choice of the ones who wants a basic cap, but with a slight edge to it.

Red beanie brand
The simple branding process. In the first round of branding material, not much changed from final sketch to digitalized asset.

It still is a classic though, and draws much of its inspiration back to the movie The Life Aquatic, which itself draws on the real life character Jacques Costeau.

Children Invade the Brand

A long time we only had two models, one color. And I refused every suggestion for additional colors and other products — very purposefully. I felt like if we were going to be the Red Hat Factory, we need to have at least a year, where we are just that — a factory of Red Hats.

As a side note, we aren’t really using a factory — it is true hand knit. But that is a different story.

The third beanie model, the Bay Bee, has a boringly simple history. When a friend, in our early days, asked if we had one for children, we said yes, and made a smaller version of the Southlander.

Not much more to say on that.

There is an interesting feature to the baby model, however. You know how I told you that the wool beanies are very small, and stretches a lot to fit your head. This is just how wool needs to be to properly fit you. On the Bay Bee, this makes the beanie fit from babyhood to 3-4 years old, but look very different at each stage.

You can see we stuck with the simple names, but you’ll notice, the following drawing is a little more polished around the edges than its predecessors. This actually inspired me to rebrand and rename all the beanies in turn.

First branding of the red beanie for babies.
The first Baby model.

Talking of that stretchiness

Most our customers express surprise when they see the size of the new beanie. It is small.

Your average cotton beanie doesn’t stretch a lot, so what you see is what you get. A wollen knit cap will grow with you, and take its shape from your head. In the beginning, the hat can even be a bit slippy for some people, especially when your hair is newly shampooed.

Like a good pair of selvedge jeans, or a new set of leather boots, it needs to be worn in. After that, it will be your most trusty friend.

No brand for a reason

Many also express surprise at the lack of any brand assets on the cap. You get a Certificate of Authenticity upon purchase, and there will be stickers in the box — but the beanie itself is completely bare.

Red beanies in a stack.
The branding is found separately on the box and on stickers — but the beanie itself is bare bone.

We chose this because of the history of the brand. Taking the experience of growing up with a knitting mother and bringing it to you. When she knit me a piece, there was no brand. It was pure, just a gift of love from a parent to a child, and therefore we keep the beanies pure.

Washing instructions are found on the web.

With the lack of brand, the texture of the beanie needs to stand out even more, and so it does. We chose wool partly for its features (isolates even when wet), but also a lot because of its look. Gritty and rough, connecting you with the hard worker on the seas a hundred years ago, the construction workers balancing the beams of Empire State Building when it came up, and the kind hands that knit it — stitch by stitch, with care.

How to Wear a Red Hat Factory Cap

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on April 15, 2019 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

There are actually more ways than you might think, and the choice is all yours.

Our models deliver as a tube that you are free to fold as you like, and the lack of any tags on the edges makes your freedom total.

One thing I’ve noticed through selling beanies all across the world — no one wears it the same, and that is the beauty of it.

With that said we have three basic ways of wearing a Red Hat Factory cap.

The single fold

If it is a little bit colder, you might want yo go for a single fold, as I did on this old picture. Though it is my second favorite fold, it looks awesome, and it gives space for you to pull it over your ears if you please.

How to wear your red cap: Single fold

My favorite — fold your cap twice

My favorite style, and the one most commonly used by Red Hatters around the world, is the double fold.

Here’s Sophia with the basic double fold.

How to wear your red cap: Double fold
A classic double fold.

The third way to wear a red hat factory cap — the roll

I honestly can’t tell if this picture a roll or a sloppy double fold, but I like the idea of rolling the edge, as opposed to doing sharp folds. And I have seen it done, looking great!

How to wear your red cap: Rolled up

Conclusion — wear your cap your way

Just to underline how different we are, and how the caps we wear shape to our style and head shape – here is a bunch of people wearing it their way.

Be like them – unlike each other.

The Red Knit Cap as a Symbol of Adventure

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on December 19, 2017 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

Red knit caps have over time become a symbol of adventure and exploration, across the world, and also deeply rooted in Norwegian folklore. How did it become such an iconic piece of headwear, and what is the origin of the red hat?

Traditionally, a beanie, hat or a knit cap—which is the technically correct term—is a working man’s outfit. Seamen, foresters, explorers—anyone spending their work days outside would—and still do—use it for the obvious purpose of keeping the head warm.

In Scandinavia some form of cap resembling the modern knit cap has been used already since the days of the Vikings, and when knitting entered the region around the 17th century, it slowly replaced the classic skill of nålebinding, and became the primary way of hand crafting caps.

Askeladden — The Original Norwegian Red Hatter

In Norwegian folklore there is this character that keeps appearing—seemingly jumping around through stories, making his way into most of the main fairy tales. His name is Askeladden, roughly translated into “The Ash Lad.” He is famous for tricking trolls, riding magical flying ships, and other true adventures—all wearing a red knit cap with a pom-pom—a Scandinavian tradition since long back.

Quick word fact: The word “adventure”, shares a common root with the Norwegian word “eventyr.” The Norwegian word means “adventure”, but also “fairy tale.” And that connection is there for a reason. Almost all Norwegian fairy tales is about someone going on an adventure. Especially our red capped friend Askeladden.

The topplue — a knit cap with a pom-pom — is something incredibly Norwegian. (Though all of Scandinavia probably could and would claim it as theirs). I did absolutely grow up wearing one of these.

The “topp” from “topplue” refers to the top, meaning the pom-pom. The one I wore was sadly not a red one, but a black one streaked with really ugly pink lines, which I borrowed from my dad. I will spare you the picture for now.

Askeladden, a red knit cap wearer.
Askeladden, the red capped Norwegian fairy tale character.

When you look at pictures of Askeladden, you cannot help but have your thoughts going to the classic Norwegian fjøsnisse. He’s a little guy that is presumed to live on the hayloft of farms, and come out and either help or sabotage things on the farm. Around Christmas, one would put out a little porridge on ones porch to thank him for his help (and maybe bribe him into not sabotaging you).

The Norwegian fjøsnisse.

This Christmas tradition was the last fjøsnisse-related activity to be observed, and therefore the images of the red-cap-wearing fjøsnisse, and the red Santa Claus that would later be imported from America began blending together.

Fjøsnisse now equals Christmas.

If we look into the history of why the fjøsnisse wears a red cap, however, it might turn out we got some things the wrong way around.

Coca-Cola and Santa Claus

Yes.

It is not a historical deep exciting root that makes Santa Claus currently wear red. It is in a large part the result of a huge marketing effort by Coca-Cola in the 1930’s.

Santa, wearing red cap.
Coke-red santa.

Somebody made a red Santa, at a time when he was portrayed in different colors — often blue — and Coke picked it up in order to turn their brand into an all-season drink. Before this, people mostly bought it during hot summer days. This Santa is still highly associated with Coca-Cola, and the marketing campaign established Santa as a red cap wearer until this day.

From this time forward, the American Santa Claus, the Norwegian fjøsnisse, the English Father Christmas, and many other has blended increasingly into one entity.

If this is why Norwegians depict their fjøsnisse with a red knit cap today, I don’t know, and would love to hear your input on it, but it seems highly likely. I imagine the classic Norwegian folk tale being slowly saturated by the influence of the Coke Santa’s globalization, and now is known to wear red.

Zissou or Jacques Costeau?

If we are talking about one person in the entire world that made the red knit cap into a symbol of exploration, one must instantly go to Mr. Costeau. You may not know him, but maybe know Steve Zissou, from Life Aquatic?

Jaques Cousteau
Jaques Yves-Cousteau

Zissou is a film icon, but he is inspired and based on a real life adventurer, red hat wearer and explorer icon named Jacques Yves-Costeau. He was a pioneer in diving and sea life exploration. Such was his love for the ocean and nature in general, that he is quoted explaining how we should start killing off large amounts of humans to save the planet.

Red knit cap on Jacques Yves-Costeau.
Jaques Yves-Costeau added serious value to the red knit cap.

However. He also delivered a lot of quotable lines of a much lighter nature. Let us instead pick a beautiful one.

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever.

Jaques Yves-Cousteau

Now, the reason why we love him so much is his taste in knit caps. If you take a look at him, you will notice his excellent cap taste — a style that has been part of influencing the development of the Southlander, our most basic red hand knit cap.

Steve Zissou Red Hat
Steve Zissou in Life Aquatic.

Steve Zissou, and the film The Life Aquatic is a case study in red explorer caps. Their team colors in the film are blue shirts and red knit caps, some of them wearing rounded caps like the Southlander, and Zissou himself wearing a pointy tip one that was part of influencing the design of our North Cap. Also one can see a really nice pom-pom flapping around in the movie.

The film is completely based off of Jaques Cousteau, and is in fact dedicated to him.

Steve Zissou’s red pointy knit cap. Good taste!

The Workingman Knit Cap Brought to the Office

In Norway we have a living legend. His name is Olav Thon, and he owns a chain of hotels — Thon Hotels. He is one of the richest people in Norway, but also seems to be an incredibly chill person.

Olav Thon was color blocking long before color blocking was hip.

He wears colorful suits to high end business meetings, and is quoted saying something like the following.

If I had to wear those regular black suits, I would be bored to death.

My Paraphrase of Olav Thon

He is an honorary member of the Norwegian tourist union, and spends huge amounts of time in nature — a true son of Norway. But this, of course, is not our favorite part of him. We have to look higher.

Olav Thon wears a red knit cap.
Olav Thon, the hotel king of Norway, faithfully wears his knit cap.

He faithfully wears a red knit cap. He has proven one can wear a knit cap to business meetings and still be successful. Thank God!

So when I wear my red Southlander in Norway — no surprise — people keep calling me Olav Thon.

Color Blocking Against Nature

One of the historical reasons for wearing a red cap may very well be how one stands out against nature tones. Very much like workers nowadays wears yellow or orange work clothes to stand out.

I have noticed the effect of this. I am a relatively tall guy, faithfully wearing his red hat, and whenever I am to meet somebody downtown, they instantly spot me from a distance because of the red hat. It is more than a hat, it’s a gps!

The red really stands nicely out against nature tones or black.

One of Sweden’s great sons, Mora-Nisse — a famous cross country skier — became known for wearing his red hat as part of his competing outfit.

Lars “Mora Nisse” Karlsson with a red cap with a pom-pom.
Lars “Mora Nisse” Karlsson wearing his iconic red cap with a pom-pom.

He won the infamous Vasaloppet in Sweden year after year, all in all nine times! And all of this while wearing a nice red knit cap with a pom-pom dangling from the top. I bet he was easy to spot in the track with that red hat against a backdrop of white snow.

I do not know if the red hat is why he was named such, but the word “nisse” refers to the red hat wearing little creature which we Norwegians call fjøsnisse, and thereby draws this very article straight back to the starting point.

Adventures, fairy tales, bold colors, red knit caps! It is all connected like the stitches that make up one of our hand knit caps.

Hand Knit Red Caps — Back to the Roots

We at Red Hat Factory are going back to the roots. We are hand knitting every single of our caps from the bottom up, the traditional way, as they have done through generations in Norway.

We aim to keep this handcraft alive for many more years, and keep promoting a culture where people can live of off their handiwork.

Turning a Labour of Love Into a Job

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on December 7, 2017 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

I have always admired and sought after the feeling of being able to go to work and enjoy your craft together with friends. No stress, only good company and the satisfaction of a job well done. The world has a way of pushing against this, turning up the heat, and demanding slightly more than you can produce. At times, I think we should push back.

Traditionally, hand knitting in Norway has been a matter of the mother of the household having to turn those sheep grazing outside into heat for the approaching winter. As a way of protecting and caring for your family, it is a labour of love in the truest sense of the word.

Sheep resting in Lofoten Norway
Those sheep have to be used for all that they’re worth.

Now, years and years later, industrialization has revolutionized the country, and the culture is so different that some would be offended only because I said it was the mother who did the knitting – which it traditionally has been. That is a whole another discussion, but hand knitting still lives on, only it has gone from being a means of surviving the snowfalls, into a hobby or side project – still a labour of love, but not as functional as it once was. And when an entire generation has had this as a hobby, and from time to time been selling it for a symbolic sum, it is hard to turn the prices back up.

Here at Red Hat Factory, we believe that everyone should be able to work with something they love, and that this is actually possible, but it partly requires a return to the value and respect of hand crafts of all kinds. It requires that humanity takes a step back, to find pleasure in their work again.

Four Hours = One Hat

One Red Hat Factory cap generally takes about four hours of handiwork, not counting the endless practice hours and knitting heritage that goes into each and every hat. That means that for every thousandth cap we sell, we have enabled hand knitters to work four thousand hours, in a tempo that doesn’t wear out the creator.

Keep in mind the effort that has gone into each product, and that by buying a Red Hat Factory product, you are enabling a long standing tradition to live on into future generations.

Twenty Crowns an Hour

So my mother and some of her neighbors were hanging out in their knitting-club, when the subject of hourly pay came up they had to laugh a little. Usually they sell a product for a fixed price that they imagine a customer would be willing to pay, and they don’t pay very much attention to the hours.

But now they did.

Curiosity sparked, they did a rough approximation of the pay-per-hour they got in the end after selling a basic wool sweater to a customer. The number that came out was twenty crowns!

You may not know how much a Norwegian Crown is worth, and the value needs to be seen in comparison to Norwegian prices. So here it is: Twenty Norwegian Crowns can get you approximately one bread – but not one of the high end ones.

So clearly this handicraft is still viewed very much as a hobby and that, we intend to change.

Paying a Price Makes You Value The Product

You will never appreciate a cheap, mass produced sweater the way that you value something that you had to save up to afford, maybe wait for it to be finished, and then have it staying with you through the years, taking the heat, and getting the wear and tear that is involved in heritage products.

Two Rounded Red Hats. One new, and one worn for over a year around the world.
After over a year of almost daily use, the hat on top starts to have a heritage of its own. It gets rougher, and in my opinion, much better looking.

There is something in the very fabric of Red Hat Factory, that makes us want to create space. Space for you to maybe wait a bit before you receive your product, space for you to long a little bit before you have it in your hands. Space for the craftspeople to care for each and every hat—not being stressed by a demand to produce in a hurry.

Chill out. It is healthy.

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