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Five Things You Might Not Know About Our Wool Sweater

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on October 26, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

When we were releasing our new sweater the All Man’s Right, we posted a series of five facts about the product to our social media, as we were dropping it. Here are the five points.

1. It’s hand knit

In fact all the products here at Red Hat Factory are hand knit. It is kind of our basic idea. We want to push back against a culture of over consumption and over production, and we do it by putting a bit of spotlight on the handmade.

There is something to a handmade product that makes it a special keepsake. You know it took time, and you know someone personally sat down and made what you now hold in your hand.

Norwegian tailored hand knit wool sweater

2. It’s tailored

While one-size works for our beanies, it won’t work for a sweater. Tailoring each sweater, of course, only kicks the handmadeness to the next level. You give us a list of measurements outlined on the product page, and we deliver a sweater that specifically suits you.

Norwegian tailored hand knit wool sweater

3. It takes 40 hours to knit

This may be shocking to some. A full work week? Sometimes it takes more, sometimes less, but 40 is a good average.

Had you hired for example a mechanic for those hours, you’d be spending tens of thousands of kroners (Norwegian currency), so how come we can charge what we do for the sweaters?

The art of sweater knitting is ancient, and therefore it comes with a culture where it was the housewife creating products to protect her own family through the cold Nordic winters.

It didn’t come out of a commercial idea.

Therefore genuinely hand knit sweaters are mostly made and given as gifts from Norwegian mothers to their children. Sales mostly go for mere symbolic sums.

We can however justify selling so many work hours for a package price because of a little quirk. My mother don’t ever stop knitting. On an airplane, in the car, at a party, hanging out with a crew of like minded knitters, she never stops!

That is why the products go out at the price they do. She would have knit them anyhow. But don’t go looking for a career in knitting if you want to get rich. This is a product of pure passion.

Norwegian tailored hand knit wool sweater

4. It’s our own pattern

Tying back into the angular style of Norwegian traditional patterns, my mother made her own. This is nothing new to her, since she has been designing unique sweaters and patterns for years, but I must say she outdid herself on this one.

With this pattern, we went for a simplicity that could suit the all-man, but still looks completely Nordicly traditional.

Norwegian wool sweater in the mountains

5. It’s 100% wool

Our earlier products have been respectively 80 and 85% wool, because of how the different properties of those mixtures of yarn benefit those products. The wool sweater however was the first perfect fit for a 100% pure sheep wool yarn, and I am very happy to say so.

The closer to nature the better.

How to Care for a Wool Sweater

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on October 24, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

A Red Hat Factory wool sweater is knit the old way with 100% wool, and is therefore in demand of a bit more care than your average cotton hoodie.

Like a nice pair of leather shoes needs their oil, our tailored hand knit sweater, the All Man’s Right, needs some love. These are general tips for most wool sweaters though, so feel free to use the guide for your own home knit sweater as well.

Nothing beats a hand knit wool sweater.

The most important points

  • Wash at 40° wool setting.
  • Don’t hand wash.
  • Don’t tumble dry.
  • Dry laying down.
  • It will require patching up.

But please continue reading.

Washing your wool sweater

My mother actually warned me not to hand wash my sweaters. The gentle lapping of the wool setting on the washing machine is better, since it repeats the same patterns back and forth without twisting the wool.

If your wool setting centrifuges it, don’t worry. The setting knows what it’s doing.

Drying your wool sweater

First of all: For God’s sake, do not tumble dry any wool! That turn it into something else entirely.

While that is obvious to a lot of you, the next advice is not equally intuitive.

I did the mistake that I hung one of my sweaters it up to dry. This resulted in a bad stretch. Wool sweaters have to dry laying flat. For example, spread it out across a wash stand.

Patching up a wool sweater

If you have some skill in knitting or in sowing you may patch the sweater up yourself. Otherwise we offer a patching service for buyers of our own All Man’s Right sweaters.

You’ll want to know a few things about tearing and patching.

How often do you need to patch it up?

This varies a lot from person to person, but I’ve found on my four wool sweaters I’ve needed about a patch every third year (on each sweater). The most important thing is to patch it up as soon as it gets a tear, before it starts unravelling.

Patches look like patches

Yes. We won’t be able to perfectly patch it up, so like a scar, it’s going ot get strong again, but the memory of the injury will be visible. This, in my opinion, is something positive. The lore of your sweater only grows. Also, the coloring of different batches of yarn differ slightly, so the patches may also have small color varieties. (Which in my opinion is totally epic).

Wool sweater with patch.
The patch on one of my wool sweaters’ elbow.

It think that is all you need to know to be ready to adopt a genuine hand knit wool sweater, and ensure a long and happy life for it.

4 Outfits That Go With a Red Cap

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on October 16, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

The red hand knit cap is the beginning and the heart of our company. Everyone from Jaques Cousteau to Kanye West wears them. But what outfits go well with a red beanie?

1. Red cap, blue denim shirt — Marvin Gaye, Jaques Cousteau, Steve Zissou

They are poster children for the red cap, and are mentioned a lot in Red Hat Factory articles. What all their iconic outfits have in common is the red/blue contrast, which is one of my personal favorites. I often wear a denim shirt with my red cap.

2. Red cap, green jacket — Kanye West

In nature, the red cap stands out, and that is kind of the point. Wearing military style greens with the cap is never a mistake. Especially if you’re out hunting and want to avoid being mistaken for a moose.

As you blend with nature, the cap pops even more.

It is yet another favorite for us at the Factory.

3. Red cap, yellow rain jacket

Yellow has become the iconic color for rain jackets. Red is the same for knit caps. Two bright icons together creates a colorful collision. Also, the rain jacket as a fisherman’s working wear, draws out the history of the fisherman beanie in your outfit.

Red cap, yellow rain jacket.
The red cap goes so well with a yellow rain jacket.

4. Red cap on a monochrome backdrop

Black and white are seldom wrong “color” choices when it comes to lending voice to other pieces of apparel. If you want your beanie to shine, why not go monochrome — white or black?

Red cap on black and white shirt
Black and white, with a radiating spot of red.

Confidence

Here at Red Hat Factory we are much more interested in seeing what you can come up with.

How you integrate our caps into your style is way more fun than telling you how to do it. That is why we deliver our hand knit pieces as a long “sausage” of wool that you fold yourself.

After all, though it’s a corny thing to say, the best piece of apparel is actually confidence.

The History of the Fisherman Beanie

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on September 10, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

Rough, sturdy and simple — the working class fisherman and his rough knit cap has ever been an inspiration for how we knit our products. But how deep into that history can we dig?

We already wrote a whole article about the Steve Zissou hat, and how that has shaped our beanies. Steve is a fictional character who draws his inspiration from red beanie wearing, submarine genius Jaques Cousteau. But what inspiration was he drawing on? — what connected beanies to the seafarer in the first place?

History of the fisherman beanie

I’d love to come up with something deeply symbolic, but I think history is very simple — yet beautiful — when it comes to the fisherman beanie.

Imagine coastal society. It’s a time when most women are the keepers of the house, while the men are out providing for the family’s economical needs.

“The Knitting Woman” by William-Adolphe Bouguereau

Say what you want about gender roles — I’m not here to discuss that, but simply to dig into history.

There are deep historical roots to why knitting is prevalent among women in Norway (where Red Hat Factory comes from) to this day. I know my mother learnt it from her mother, who again probably learnt it from hers — the roots stretch far back.

Those days were a time when the woman was tasked with actually protecting the household against the elements — and among the responsibilities was keeping her family warm at the onset of winter.

In our imagined little coastal society, not all the fishermen could afford a water proof sou’wester, so the next best alternative stood in line. Wool was readily available, and the property of wool that isolates even when wet made it a fine second choice.

So she knits him a beanie, tight knit because of years of skill (she has knit for every one of her seven kids) and full of care because she desperately wants her man to come home from the sea, today as every day before.

“The Old Fisherman” by Paul Crompton. The fisherman wears the more sophisticated sou’wester.

In this way the hand knit fisherman beanie represents a simple life of hard work and survival that most people through history has lived.

It is good to look at history for perspective, and maybe to gain some gratefulness.

Real fishermen beanies

Finding images of actual fishermen, wearing beanies is tremendously hard. The modern trend of the fisherman beanie has taken over image searches, pushing the black and white genuine photos aside.

Mostly whenever I find a picture of what we would call a fisherman beanie today, it turns out to be a modern day portrait, taken with a vintage style. The real pictures I’ve found however, reveals something very interesting.

It seems that people put whatever they wanted on their heads before heading out to sea. And that is just how we like it.

The super long fishermen beanies with pom-poms

You might have noticed on the first picture, beside Cousteau, that the fisherman has an incredibly long beanie with a pom-pom at the end.

The style derives from fishing societies in Portugal, specifically the Povoan culture.

The culture was centered around fishing. Their legends and their religion — it all swirled around the sea, sea creatures and fish. Saint Andrew was believed to fish the souls of the perished at sea into heaven, and they avoided work on Sunday because of an old legend about a sea serpent punishing people who violated the holy day of rest.

Most importantly though, they wore the longest fishermen beanies the world has ever seen with pom-pom and all — and with that they sported the wildest sideburns known to man.

Deeming from the last illustration, the beanies were even red. And you know exactly how we feel about that!

The Shaping of Our Beanie Models

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on September 4, 2020 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

When we set out to design the first ever Red Hat Factory model, we didn’t go looking for the spectacular. Quite the contrary.

Looking at products and heritage items we consider absolute classics, we noticed one commonality. The classic yellow rain jacket, rough worn oak tables, faded leather belts, the knives that my dad has hanging on his wall, that we have used on all my childhood adventures — they all share one trait.

Simplicity.

From the outset, we knew we were making a product the old way — the way it’s been done from generation to generation. And wanting to also create a product that would be appreciated for generations, I let my mom take me back in time, showing me an array of basic simple knitting methods and their aesthetics.

Red beanie on Norwegian traditional wool sweater.
What we in Norway call ribbestrikk. It’s one of the basic tools of the craft. Here a Southlander is laying on a Norwegian Setesdalsgenser — a regional traditional sweater pattern.

Following the red thread

I’ve learned through both design and writing, that the creative process often starts with a more bloated product, and then is slimmed down through the cutting off of unnecessary features.

I am sure a lot of you can relate that to your own work. We often over-design — then cut back.

For the first Red Hat Factory cap, we went through 5–10 different models, and model by model we dropped things. First the unique knit pattern along the edge, then the shaped panels that gave an approximate head shape to the product.

Four red beanie styles
An extremely rare photo of some of the pre-production experimental models. My wife right there in the middle. Most, if not all these beanies are given away a long time ago.

Finally, after hours upon hours of work, I dropped a final idea on my mother. “What if we just make the hat a tube, and let the owner shape it by wearing it.”

It sounds boring, but in all its simplicity, it actually worked best.

And the people loved it.

“The quality is amazing, and I know I’ll be able to use it for years to come!”

Morten Furre, Australia

“Fantastic quality, durable and stylish. Each Red Hat has been hand crafted with love and attention to detail.”

Greg Burkin, Canada
Red beanie on Norwegian traditional sweater.
The final beanie is just a tube sown together on the top. You create the fold yourself.

“[The Southlander] is by far my favorite – it’s quality top notch and unlike my other beanies it feels just perfect. Whether you’re dressed up and going out on the town or just heading to the store this is a must for any occasion.”

Nathan Pearson, USA

“I am using the Southlander pretty much every day.”

Asbjørn Østreim, Norway

“Like a good wine, this gets better with age.”

Billy Chester, USA

We knew we had hit something.

First model down

Finally the first of what was to become the Southlander was off the needles, knit using the technique called ribbestrikk in Norwegian, and sowed together in an x on the top. Nothing more nothing less.

Red beanie in Stockholm
Me randomly snatching brand photos while hanging out with friends in Stockholm. This is the first Southlander ever made (at the time called “the Rounded”) and I still have it at home.

The tube shape makes it look small when you get it, but once it’s had some time to shape itself to your head, it becomes better fitted to you than any pre-formed shape could bring.

Also, since the cap is a simple tube with no defined edge, you control how you fold it. We have another article that dives deeper into possible folding styles.

From fishermen to carpenters, the simple, yet gritty style of a workman’s beanie has been a hallmark of the hard working craftsman.

Simple is classic.

Simple hats, simple brand

When we first released the beanies to the webshop, the Southlander was simply named the Rounded. And paired with the simple design and the simple name, came a very simple sketched icon.

First brand of the rounded red beanie.
The first Red Hat Factory product — the Rounded.

The whole brand was built and centered from the historic notion of the old beanie, knit by a wife before she sent her husband out on the sea to haul fish nets in the pouring rain.

While he is out fishing, the woman gets a business idea, and hastily she sketches down a few beanies with her pen. Then she sighs and peers out the window, wondering whether he will return today or not.

Little did that proverbial woman know she was planting the seed of Red Hat Factory to come.

That is the story behind the type of assets we use in the brand to this day. They have evolved a lot, but the style remains. Mom-made. Home made. Simple lines.

Three red beanies.
The three beanie models we have today, with the overhauled brand names.

A Point to the Round

The North Cap was at first a failed attempt to cap off the beanie in a round fashion. It became pointier than it was supposed to.

When my quirky brother in law saw it, however, he loved it more than what I considered the final product. I soon realized we needed a second model. Based on the first, but with a touch of different, for the more explorative soul.

In line with the simple brand, we just named it the Pointy Tip.

Red beanie.
The second model’s initial branding.

Its base was, and still is, exactly the same as the Southlander, but it caps off in a peak rather than a half circle, making it the first choice of the ones who wants a basic cap, but with a slight edge to it.

Red beanie brand
The simple branding process. In the first round of branding material, not much changed from final sketch to digitalized asset.

It still is a classic though, and draws much of its inspiration back to the movie The Life Aquatic, which itself draws on the real life character Jacques Costeau.

Children Invade the Brand

A long time we only had two models, one color. And I refused every suggestion for additional colors and other products — very purposefully. I felt like if we were going to be the Red Hat Factory, we need to have at least a year, where we are just that — a factory of Red Hats.

As a side note, we aren’t really using a factory — it is true hand knit. But that is a different story.

The third beanie model, the Bay Bee, has a boringly simple history. When a friend, in our early days, asked if we had one for children, we said yes, and made a smaller version of the Southlander.

Not much more to say on that.

There is an interesting feature to the baby model, however. You know how I told you that the wool beanies are very small, and stretches a lot to fit your head. This is just how wool needs to be to properly fit you. On the Bay Bee, this makes the beanie fit from babyhood to 3-4 years old, but look very different at each stage.

You can see we stuck with the simple names, but you’ll notice, the following drawing is a little more polished around the edges than its predecessors. This actually inspired me to rebrand and rename all the beanies in turn.

First branding of the red beanie for babies.
The first Baby model.

Talking of that stretchiness

Most our customers express surprise when they see the size of the new beanie. It is small.

Your average cotton beanie doesn’t stretch a lot, so what you see is what you get. A wollen knit cap will grow with you, and take its shape from your head. In the beginning, the hat can even be a bit slippy for some people, especially when your hair is newly shampooed.

Like a good pair of selvedge jeans, or a new set of leather boots, it needs to be worn in. After that, it will be your most trusty friend.

No brand for a reason

Many also express surprise at the lack of any brand assets on the cap. You get a Certificate of Authenticity upon purchase, and there will be stickers in the box — but the beanie itself is completely bare.

Red beanies in a stack.
The branding is found separately on the box and on stickers — but the beanie itself is bare bone.

We chose this because of the history of the brand. Taking the experience of growing up with a knitting mother and bringing it to you. When she knit me a piece, there was no brand. It was pure, just a gift of love from a parent to a child, and therefore we keep the beanies pure.

Washing instructions are found on the web.

With the lack of brand, the texture of the beanie needs to stand out even more, and so it does. We chose wool partly for its features (isolates even when wet), but also a lot because of its look. Gritty and rough, connecting you with the hard worker on the seas a hundred years ago, the construction workers balancing the beams of Empire State Building when it came up, and the kind hands that knit it — stitch by stitch, with care.

One Sock to Rule them All —New Product in Store

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on July 1, 2020 in News Reel Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

When my brother in law came into my apartment while I was drying wool socks after laundry, he made me realize something. Not everyone has a basket of 25 pairs of wooly socks right inside the door.

When I grew up this was normal. As Norwegians, we live pretty far into the northern hemisphere, and floors get cold. When the termometer drops below -20℃ (-4℉), your sweet leather boots aren’t always enough. That is why the average Norwegian household has a basket of family-shared wooly socks in the hallway near the front door.

Norwegians wear a lot of wool socks.
Ben Laws, the infamous mind behind MacLaren Barbers.

The Grandmother Resistance Movement

When I was little, I was into film-making big time. We made action movies with polyphonic ringtones playing Mission Impossible in the background, and basically ran around beating each other up in the forest and bringing each other to justice. Before I had editing software we re-shot scenes by rewinding the tape and filming over the old stuff — something that resulted in a lot of funny choppy transitions.

Anyhow.

At this time in my life I started writing on a script idea. The Grandmother Resistance Movement. It would be a comedy about how during WWII grandmothers formed an underground knitting movement, where they provided soldiers with warm wooly socks. They would have their own secret communication networks through tapping morse code on their knitting needles, and they’d smuggle baskets of socks through the mountains to get to the front lines. All in skirts and with permanent. (Perm — something all Norwegian grandmothers have.)

Norwegians making movies.
This is a frame, featuring me, from a bear hunting tutorial me and my neighbors made around that time.

From reminiscing about 13 year old me coming up with this idea, it is pretty clear that the hand knit wool sock stood pretty strong in our culture. It was the standing joke that we’d get socks for Christmas if we didn’t behave — then we grew up, and what had been a threat became a treat. When we shopped for winter boots, we always made sure there was space for the thick wooly socks inside. We’d simply never go out in snow boots without them.

Lucky bastards

While we as Norwegians are lucky enough that a fine pair of hand knit wool socks are used as a threat, not all of you have a Norwegian grandma. That is why we make our mission to make it available for you. Yet another little piece of our culture shared with you. Knit by genuine Norwegian mothers, grandmothers, great grandmothers, and quite frankly, even great great grandmothers.

Word of the day: Great great grandmother in Norwegian is tippoldemor.

As we take the step into (pun intended) a future of being more than just a Hat Factory, what better product to bring than the grandmother-made standard issue Norwegian Wool Sock.

I bring you The Grandma(ster).

Old Lady Advice from My Mother (And New Packaging)

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on February 6, 2020 in News Reel Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

Am I calling my own mother an old lady? Not really. But… it wouldn’t have been that bad. In our family age is something we try to honor and are proud of. Age is wisdom, and old age is when you’re entitled to more comfort and respect from those around you.

We believe that older generations have wisdom to pass on to the next one, and we have found a way to include more of that into Red Hat Factory.

“Old lady advice” or — the less flattering translation — “hag advice” is a saying or proverb that has gone from generation to generation. No one knows from when or where it originated, but everyone has heard it.

A good example came early this year, when my Grandmother suddenly exclaimed, as we were dining Norwegian lapskaus: “There’s a difference between daddy and the cat.”

I had to have it explained for me by my mom later that evening. The proverb had been said because I couldn’t eat the dessert (because of allergies). In this proverb I was the cat who’s not getting what’s served at the table. Not everyone should be equally treated — the worker is worth his pay, as they say.

These proverbs were more freely thrown around back in the days, and since we are all about Norwegian traditional knitting, we’ll throw another piece of Norsk culture into the mix.

A Norwegian blessing

From 2020 on you will get a handwritten note with a selected piece of old lady advice or an old Norwegian blessing, written in Norwegian with every beanie you order. It doesn’t get more primal than that.

Norwegian Proverb
A classic Norwegian blessing.

The one in the picture is a classic Norwegian blessing, incorporating old fashioned humor, rhymes, and a reference to a classic toilet.

Spoiler alert: Some are more serious than others.

It is only a few generations since everyone had an “outside-toilet” (utedo). These usually stood (some still do, especially outside the typical Norwegian mountain cabin) on the edge of a precipice or wall, so the waste could gather up in some sort of tank, or area below. This was excellent fertilizer, so grass normally grew rapidly in the general area behind the toilet. This card says “may happiness grow, as grass behind the toilet.” In Norwegian, that rhymes.

If you receive a card, and want the translation and decipher the meaning, you’ll have to chat with us, and that’s just what we want — more connection with you guys. You’re the ones making Red Hat Factory an exciting journey, and we always love hearing from you.

A worthy packaging

The beanies we sell in store at MacLaren Barbers have been packed in modest slick white packages, with each respective logo stickered on the front. Because of an issue with shipping from Norway, we couldn’t use the same for our beanies through mail.

Now however, I have found some packages that work for international shipping, and we can finally deliver the beanies just as we wanted all along. It has taken some time, because this is a small family business, and many things have been higher on my priority list. But, here it is.

How to Wear a Red Hat Factory Cap

Written by Benjamin Antoni Andersen Published on April 15, 2019 in Essentials Designer and instigator of Red Hat Factory, constantly hungry for mountainous adventures.

There are actually more ways than you might think, and the choice is all yours.

Our models deliver as a tube that you are free to fold as you like, and the lack of any tags on the edges makes your freedom total.

One thing I’ve noticed through selling beanies all across the world — no one wears it the same, and that is the beauty of it.

With that said we have three basic ways of wearing a Red Hat Factory cap.

The single fold

If it is a little bit colder, you might want yo go for a single fold, as I did on this old picture. Though it is my second favorite fold, it looks awesome, and it gives space for you to pull it over your ears if you please.

How to wear your red cap: Single fold

My favorite — fold your cap twice

My favorite style, and the one most commonly used by Red Hatters around the world, is the double fold.

Here’s Sophia with the basic double fold.

How to wear your red cap: Double fold
A classic double fold.

The third way to wear a red hat factory cap — the roll

I honestly can’t tell if this picture a roll or a sloppy double fold, but I like the idea of rolling the edge, as opposed to doing sharp folds. And I have seen it done, looking great!

How to wear your red cap: Rolled up

Conclusion — wear your cap your way

Just to underline how different we are, and how the caps we wear shape to our style and head shape – here is a bunch of people wearing it their way.

Be like them – unlike each other.

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